Citations

From Encyclopedia of Wisconsin Environmental History
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This article is currently in Draft status.

Articles and Essays should use endnote citations in order to indicate the source of information and to avoid plagiarism. Please adhere to the following guidelines. For image citations, see Citing Image Sources.

References Section

  • Include a References section and the references tag immediately following the main text of each article or essay. This section will be automatically populated with endnotes, based upon any inline citations included on the page.
==References==
 <references />

Inline Footnote/Endnote Formatting

  • Provide inline citations in the article or essay, immediately following the end punctuation of the sentence, sentences, or quotation that requires a citation.
  • Enclose inline quotations in the reference tags, as shown below:
<ref>citation goes here</ref>
  • Use Chicago-style footnotes/endnotes to cite all sources within the main text. For citation formats, see:
  • For "Additional Published Resources" and "Archival Resources for Further Research" (optional sections), use Chicago bibliography format. (Note that unlike the endnote format, the bibliography format places the author's last name first, in order to allow for alphabetical sorting.)

Citation Examples

Inline Footnote/Endnote

This is the required citation format to use within articles.

Website Article or Document:

Code:

<ref>"Baird Creek Master Plan," Baird Creek Preservation Foundation, 2006, p. 50, http://bairdcreek.org/about-us/baird-creek-master-plan/.</ref>

Rendered Text:

"Baird Creek Master Plan," Baird Creek Preservation Foundation, 2006, p. 50, http://bairdcreek.org/about-us/baird-creek-master-plan/.

Webpage:

Code:

<ref>"Webpage Title," Website Title, Accessed 2017-05-02, URL.</ref>

Note: Date Accessed could also be "Published" or "Updated," if that information is available.

Rendered Text:

"Webpage Title," Website Title, Accessed 2017-05-02, URL.

Example:

"About the Green Bay Garden Blitz," New Leaf Foods, Accessed 2018-05-3, http://www.newleaffoods.org/garden-blitz.html.

Online Database Article:

Code:

<ref>Ian Whyte, ''Dictionary of Environmental History'' (London, GBR: I.B. Tauris, 2013), p. 2, accessed November 8, 2015, ProQuest ebrary.</ref>

Rendered Text:

Ian Whyte, Dictionary of Environmental History (London, GBR: I.B. Tauris, 2013), p. 2, accessed November 8, 2015, ProQuest ebrary.

Bibliography Entry

Use bibliography format only for alphabetized lists of sources--not for footnotes/endnotes.

Code:

*Whyte, Ian. ''Dictionary of Environmental History.'' London, GBR: I.B. Tauris, 2013. Accessed November 8, 2015, ProQuest ebrary.

Rendered Text:

  • Whyte, Ian. Dictionary of Environmental History. London, GBR: I.B. Tauris, 2013. Accessed November 8, 2015, ProQuest ebrary.

Additional Published Resources Section

Note: This section is optional. It can be used to list important published resources that might assist future development of the article or that might be useful to scholars who wish to delve deeper. Sources should be listed alphabetically by author's last name, or by title if there is no author. Citations should be in Chicago bibliography format (example above).

  • Merchant, Carolyn. The Columbia Guide to American Environmental History. New York: Columbia University Press, 2002. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed November 24, 2015).
  • Ostergren, Robert C. and Thomas R. Vale. Wisconsin Land and Life. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1997. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed November 24, 2015).

Archival Resources for Further Research

Note: This section is optional, depending on whether there are relevant archival resources at the UWGB University Archives and Area Research Center or at the Wisconsin Historical Society.

Editing Example

This page image shows the tags for the references and reference section in the "Edit" view. To see how the references are rendered in the "Read" view, see Terra Nullius.

sample editing pages that shows the references tags
The <references /> tag automatically creates an endnote section for your article; the notes and numbers are generated automatically using citation information that is enclosed in <ref> and </ref>tags.

For additional examples, look at the "Edit" view on pages that use endnote references.