High Wind Community

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High Wind Community is a community that focuses on being one with Nature and each other. They find a spiritual connection with earth, they see earth as part of themselves, so they do their part to take care of it. They work together as a team to live a sustainable life.

Background and History

How they got started

The High Wind Community was created by Belden and Lisa Paulson. They got started by giving lectures and seminars at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where Belden Paulson worked as a professor. Thousands of people came to hear him speak from all different backgrounds such as students, business professionals, professors and even members of government. With the high popularity of his lectures the university quickly set up a schedules of seminars and offered other programs such as "Planetary Survival and the Role of Alternative Communities," and "New Dimensions in Governance-Images of Holistic Community," he did this for the next two years. In 1978, Belden spent a week at Findhorn Foundation in Scotland, where he was deeply moved by the community they have created there. [1] The Findhorn Foundation is a community were their core value is spirituality and connecting with each other and nature, their goal is to create a better world. [2] He came back transformed, he says he "had deepened my perceptions of reality far beyond anything I had learned at Oberlin College and the University of Chicago." He continued his seminars but wanted something more practical so he established the High Wind Association, he wanted to create a community like Findhorn. [3] They were able to establish a 46-acre farm, north of Milwaukee where they built a bio-shelter. [4]

About the community

Community residents wanted a new way of living, they saw all of the problems with the modern way of living and wanted something better. They would work together to do daily tasks such as gardening while learning and becoming spiritually connected to each other and to the earth. They would take several trips to Findhorn and they would also host others such as inner city Milwaukee children and university students. They even offered classes to university students on sustainability for graduation credit. [5]

What Happened to the High Wind Community

In 1991, they transformed their community from being an intentional community to being an "eco-neighborhood." Over the years the initial idealism has faded and the community member and board lost drive to continue, their efforts were exhausting and they no longer felt the same connection. For the next 10 years they served as a learning center. In 2001, the board sold the land and the buildings, farmhouse and bioshelter. Some of the residents still live there and hold tours and manage the organic farm in a major CSA region feeding over 500 families.[6]

High Wind Association Today

High Wind Association is now a globally oriented 501(c)(3) learning center focusing on how to create a sustainable future. They work on projects to improve the environment such as renewable energy and energy efficiency. They do this in a consciousness and spiritual approach. They work with spiritual organizations with these programs, people that hold the same values as they do to " walk lightly with others on this earth."

The High Wind Credo is:

    To walk gently on the earth,
    To know the spirit within,
    To hear our fellow beings,
    To invoke the light of wisdom, and
    To build the future now[7]

References

  1. Belden Paulson, High Wind: A Retrospective (Thistlefield Books, 2009), p. 56 , accessed May 1, 2018, http://thistlefieldbooks.com/Files/Communities078.pdf.
  2. "About the Findhorn Foundation" Findhorn Foundation, accessed May 1, 2018,https://www.findhorn.org/about-us/
  3. Belden Paulson, High Wind: A Retrospective (Thistlefield Books, 2009), p. 56 , accessed May 1, 2018, http://thistlefieldbooks.com/Files/Communities078.pdf.
  4. Belden Paulson, High Wind: A Retrospective (Thistlefield Books, 2009), p. 56-57 , accessed May 1, 2018, http://thistlefieldbooks.com/Files/Communities078.pdf.
  5. Belden Paulson, High Wind: A Retrospective (Thistlefield Books, 2009), p. 59 , accessed May 1, 2018, http://thistlefieldbooks.com/Files/Communities078.pdf.
  6. Belden Paulson, High Wind: A Retrospective (Thistlefield Books, 2009), p. 59 , accessed May 1, 2018, http://thistlefieldbooks.com/Files/Communities078.pdf.
  7. Windhorse Retreat Center: Community, accessed on May 1, 2019, https://windhorse.shambhala.org/community/

Additional Published Resources

http://thistlefieldbooks.com/authors.php

Article History