Navarino Nature Center

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The Navarino Nature Center is located just south of Shawano, Wisconsin. The center provides visitors with recreational opportunities year-round, and a chance to be immersed in the Navarino State Wildlife Area. The Wildlife Area is a diverse 15,000 acre chunk of land with a diverse landscape that includes bogs and open fields to name a few. The center is also a great viewing point for many different species native to Wisconsin. Whether one enjoys sitting under the sun and watching the birds, hiking on trails, or kayaking on rivers, the Navarino Nature Center has something for everyone.

History

The Navarino Nature Center (NNC) is a private, non-profit center located on the Navarino Wildlife Area. It was established in 1986, and although the center is private, it does work with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. The center itself is unique in design and works with the environment around it rather than against it. The roof of the center has solar panels on it that provide power for the entire building. These renewable energy systems heat, cool, light and generate electricity: geothermal, passive solar and solar photovoltaic. [1] Along with their solar panels, they also employ low-toxin paints and materials, energy efficient windows and lighting, water efficient plumbing fixtures, recycled materials and locally produced sustainable materials. [2] Being sustainable and green is important to the center because their goal is to teach others about how they can live sustainably and help their planet. Overall the facility helps the environment by reducing air and water pollution, and the production of greenhouse gases. [3]

Recreation

The Navarino Nature Center is located within the Navarino Wildlife Area which provides visitors with plenty of recreational activities. The land has 100 miles of trails, so in the fall, spring and summer seasons hiking and biking are always an option.[4] In the winter, snowshoeing is an option. Due to the plentiful wildlife in the area, bird watching, hunting and fishing are also recreational opportunities.[5] Two separate rivers run through the wildlife area giving visitors the option to canoe or kayak.[6] Along with all of these recreational opportunities, geocaching is also one. Geocaching is the recreational activity of hunting for and finding a hidden object by means of GPS coordinates posted on a website.[7] The center is open for all four seasons, giving visitors plenty of diverse recreational opportunities.

Navarino Nature Area

This is the 15,000 acre land surrounding the Navarino Nature Center. The land is extremely diverse in regards to the land and the wildlife. The types of land one could expect to see are: open fields, swamp conifer, lowland scrub, bogs, bottomland hardwoods, pine plantations, and many other types.[8] The two rivers that run through the land are the Shioc and Wolf rivers.[9] The combination of diverse land and water sources bring all kinds of wildlife to the land. Sandhill cranes, wild turkey, black terns, wood ducks, beavers and muskrats are just a few of the wildlife one could expect to see when visiting.[10]

References

  1. "Welcome to Navarino Nature Center," About, Accessed 2018-04-24, https://www.navarino.org/.
  2. "Welcome to Navarino Nature Center," About, Accessed 2018-04-24, https://www.navarino.org/.
  3. "Welcome to Navarino Nature Center," About, Accessed 2018-04-24, https://www.navarino.org/.
  4. "Recreational Opportunities," Welcome to Navarino Nature Center, Accessed 2018-04-24, https://www.navarino.org/recreational-opportunities.
  5. "Recreational Opportunities," Welcome to Navarino Nature Center, Accessed 2018-04-24, https://www.navarino.org/recreational-opportunities.
  6. "Recreational Opportunities," Welcome to Navarino Nature Center, Accessed 2018-04-24, https://www.navarino.org/recreational-opportunities.
  7. "geocaching," Dictionary.com, Accessed 2018-05-01, www.dictionary.com/browse/geocaching?s=t
  8. "Navarino Wildlife Area & Nature Center," Travel Wisconsin, Accessed 2018-04-24, https://www.travelwisconsin.com/science-and-nature-centers/navarino-wildlife-area-nature-center-204205.
  9. "Navarino Wildlife Area & Nature Center," Travel Wisconsin, Accessed 2018-04-24, https://www.travelwisconsin.com/science-and-nature-centers/navarino-wildlife-area-nature-center-204205.
  10. "Navarino Wildlife Area & Nature Center," Travel Wisconsin, Accessed 2018-04-24, https://www.travelwisconsin.com/science-and-nature-centers/navarino-wildlife-area-nature-center-204205.

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Additional Published Resources

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  • Merchant, Carolyn. The Columbia Guide to American Environmental History. New York: Columbia University Press, 2002. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed November 24, 2015).
  • Ostergren, Robert C. and Thomas R. Vale. Wisconsin Land and Life. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1997. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed November 24, 2015).

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