Tourism and Recreation in Wisconsin

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Wisconsin is made up of 35,000,000 acres, including 500 acres of beautiful coastal land. Parts of these natural areas include river fronts, bluffs, lakes and forests. [1] Wisconsin first started out in 1870 being logged by settlers, then later transitioned into using the land to farm and continued to shift around the 1940 into tourism [2] The lumber industry was unmanaged and free to clear cut the pristine north wood pine trees. [3] Wisconsin has continuously changed, past and present, through the influence of environmental changes. [4] The interest in outdoor tourism and recreation remains popular due to Wisconsin's diverse opportunity for different types of outdoor recreations and therefore attracting a more diverse group of people. [5]

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Dells of the Wisconsin River State Natural Area. Source: [1]

Development of Wisconsin Tourism

Around 1920, there was push to promote tourism within Wisconsin, this allowed those with the resources to get away from living in the hustle and bustle of the city to seek a refuge within the wildness of the woods and lakes [6] In 1921 the U.S. Forest Service announced that camping was free for all to enjoy. [7] Tourism begin booming and allowed people to stay in cabins, camp, or stay in resorts within the Wisconsin wilderness. [8] Tourism in Wisconsin is able to thrive due to the available sites for recreation and the natural resources which are available in these areas. [9] Economically, tourism thrives in areas where a natural area possesses an ecosystem or natural landmark with profitable natural resources. [10]

Wisconsin Recreation

Through the north woods tourism there was also a creation of more jobs. Residents of northern Wisconsin were actively encouraging the tourism because it created jobs as tour guides and working in and maintaining resorts. [11] In 2003 the Wisconsin Park & Recreation Association (WPRA) partnered with the Wisconsin State Park System. [12] The benefit in this alliance combines the resources of both organizations and makes further improvement which ables for further development of recreation while remaining environmentally friendly to the public lands and waterways in Wisconsin.[13]

Historical Changes in Tourism and Recreation

In 1878 Wisconsin's first state park was approved. Parks began forming to protect the natural land that Wisconsin housed to prevent an increase in population was also producing an increase in value of Wisconsin's natural lands. [14] From the late 1800s to early 1900s there was appreciation developing for natural attractions among those from the cities which drew them to the Wisconsin wildernesses. Door County and lake areas became popular resort destinations. [15] Throughout the mid 1900s transportation allowed accessing the wilderness easier and people begin going on road trips for leisure and camped. [16] From around 1975 to the present weekend getaways are the most popular form of tourism and recreation within Wisconsin. [17]

References

  1. Nolen, John. "State Parks for Wisconsin. Report of John Nolen, Landscape Architect, with Letter of Transmittal by State Park Board." 1909
  2. Robert Gough, "Logging, Farming and Tourism in Northern Wisconsin 1870-1940." Voyageur, 2007, 43-52.
  3. Robert Gough, "Logging, Farming and Tourism in Northern Wisconsin 1870-1940." Voyageur, 2007, 43-52.
  4. "Wisconsin's Past and Present a Historical Atlas." University of Wisconsin Press.
  5. "Wisconsin Outdoor Recreation Demand and Uses." Wisconsin Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.
  6. Robert Gough, "Logging, Farming and Tourism in Northern Wisconsin 1870-1940." Voyageur, 2007, 43-52.
  7. Robert Gough, "Logging, Farming and Tourism in Northern Wisconsin 1870-1940." Voyageur, 2007, 43-52.
  8. Robert Gough, "Logging, Farming and Tourism in Northern Wisconsin 1870-1940." Voyageur, 2007, 43-52.
  9. Marcouiller, David W., and Jeff Prey. "The Tourism Supply Linkage: Recreational Sites and Their Related Natural Amenities." The Journal of Anaylsis & Policy: 23-32.
  10. Marcouiller, David W., and Jeff Prey. "The Tourism Supply Linkage: Recreational Sites and Their Related Natural Amenities." The Journal of Anaylsis & Policy: 23-32.
  11. Robert Gough, "Logging, Farming and Tourism in Northern Wisconsin 1870-1940." Voyageur, 2007, 43-52.
  12. "Leave It Better Than You Found It: Positive Partnerships, Wisconsin." Parks & Recreation 38, no. 2 (February 2003): 6. Academic Search Complete, EBSCOhost .
  13. "Leave It Better Than You Found It: Positive Partnerships, Wisconsin." Parks & Recreation 38, no. 2 (February 2003): 6. Academic Search Complete, EBSCOhost .
  14. Nolen, John. "State Parks for Wisconsin. Report of John Nolen, Landscape Architect, with Letter of Transmittal by State Park Board." 1909
  15. "Wisconsin's Past and Present a Historical Atlas." University of Wisconsin Press.
  16. "Wisconsin's Past and Present a Historical Atlas." University of Wisconsin Press.
  17. "Wisconsin's Past and Present a Historical Atlas." University of Wisconsin Press.

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